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Health & Wellness

Eggs truly are something of a wonder food.

An egg is a tremendous serving of vitamins and nutrients in a convenient, low-cal single serve package.

One large egg only has about 72 Calories.

Yet it provides 12.5% of your daily recommended protein, 14% riboflavin and 8% or more of the daily value for several other nutrients including vitamins A, D, E, B-6, B-12, folate, iron, phosphorus, and zinc.

People used to worry that eggs were too high in cholesterol to be healthy. Not true! Studies have shown that eating eggs has no effect on blood cholesterol level or coronary heart disease incidence.

Have you ever heard of choline? If not, you’re not alone. Its role in human health was only discovered a few years ago. It is an essential nutrient for cell function, as well as liver, brain and nerve function, and plays a role in memory, heart health and transporting nutrients throughout your body. Pregnant women, mothers and babies, especially, require large amounts of choline. It is necessary for fetal brain development and milk production.

Studies have shown that most Americans do not get nearly enough choline in their diets. Fortunately, eggs have a substantial amount! Just two large eggs contain about half of the recommended amount of choline.

There are only a few foods that contain Vitamin D. These include fatty fish and—you guessed it!—eggs. Recently, the USDA discovered that eggs have even more Vitamin D than previously thought. Vitamin D is necessary for the absorption and use of calcium. It leads to healthy bones.

Eggs also contain lutein and zeaxanthin, for eye health and to help prevent cataracts and macular degeneration. The human body is better able to absorb eye-healthy lutein from eggs than from other dietary sources, according to studies.

Brown and white eggs are the same nutritionally—the difference is the breed of hen that laid them.

Raw eggs can be kept refrigerated for 4-5 weeks. They should not be stored in the refrigerator door, because the temperature changes from opening and closing the door may cause the egg to deteriorate rapidly. They should also not be stored with anything particularly odorous, as they will absorb odors and flavors through the shell.

If you refrigerate some hard-boiled eggs, however, they should be eaten within a week.

The yolk contains a higher proportion of nutrients, vitamins and minerals and protein than the white.